Nairobi’s History is Vital to its Retail Future

The hub karen

The Hub karen

The nineties in Nairobi were characterised by quiet and uninterrupted leafy suburbs and bungalows that stretched on as far as the horizon, and whatever the eye could see. This aspiring global metropolis may have lacked any great river to straddle, but it’s lifeline stemmed rather convincingly and recurrently from the double prong of administration and tourism, two key elements that have enabled it to retain its regional reign for over a century.

READ: The Architectural History of the Green City in the Sun

There was no vertical competition worth taking notice of in this era and social spaces were rather conventional and ‘natural’; families and their patriarchs were only interested in long and blissful weekend drives or walks to either the National Park, to catch up with close friends at Country Clubs, or randomly but occasionally venture to either the Yaya Centre in Kilimani or to the Mall and Sarit Centre in Westlands.

Even then, shopping malls were never places to go and hangout and eat – they were more so vestiges of serious businesses; traders in either clothes, dry-cleaning, banking or perishable goods at the supermarket. The only cinemas available in the nineties, often decked with queues that would stretch over half a kilometre long, were Kenya Cinema, the 20th Century and FOX Sarit (which happened to the newest and most state-of-the-art kid on the block.

Enter the 21st century and Nielsen data most recently ranked Kenya as the second biggest retail economy on the continent, after behemoth South Africa. Kenyans, previously contentedly oblivious to the silent retail race that had gripped much of the West, and big brother South Africa, swiftly took to the amalgamation of amenities at shopping centers. The society was rapidly being introduced to a juxtaposition of all manners and sorts, largely thanks to homegrown supermarket conglomerates that were diversifying their offering, by registering as anchor tenants at complexes that were cropping up across the city.

Nakumatt in the mid 2000s opened its most significant outlet at the corner of Ngong Road and Kingara Road, the Junction, a development that risked rivaling its own store at Prestige Plaza, but an opportunity its management would not let pass by, especially to Uchumi that was offered first dibs. This was part of a larger intrinsic framework that involved a shift in retail towards suburbia, rather than what was previously a critical angular core of Kenyatta Avenue, Kimathi Street and Mama Ngina.

Within no time, other stores were springing up as far and wide as in Doonholm Estate and Ongata Rongai, with the likes of mass market-centric Tuskys, Ukwala and Naivas Supermarkets seeking a cut in the pie. With the wholesalers, came the Banks, and the Salons, and the Restaurants & Cafes and the Cinemas. While nineties Nairobi residents would have enjoyed a cup of coffee in an alfresco Hotel balcony, the 21st century would be more characteristic of rooftop sundowners, coffee at a shopping mall cafe, or catching a movie within the confines of a shopping complex.

According to a Knight Frank 2015 report, 1.8million square feet of shopping mall space opened in Nairobi alone in 2015 and by 2017, it is expected that a further total of about 1.3million square feet will be added to this. Unreservedly, retail spaces are what drive the economic momentum of not just an urban area, but of the country. Shopping centers seek to, and more often than not successfully so, improve the quality of life of a town or a city.

In my next post, I’ll be looking at a crop of leading Shopping Centers in Kenya’s capital.

 

 

Infrastructural Development Opens Up Real Estate Across Kenya

Thika Superhighway | Photo: Jambonewspot

Thika Superhighway | Photo: Jambonewspot

Across the globe, Real estate and Infrastructure have always had close ties. Infrastructure developments often open up dormant areas and attract developers, which potentially generates high yields on investments.

Case in point, the construction of the Machakos People’s Park and the refurbishment of the town’s once grass thatched ‘stadium’ into a functional entity with decent amenities. Kenyans, and mostly those from the affluent Nairobi, Nakuru and Mombasa neighbourhoods have repetitively flocked to the ‘almost capital’ to enjoy the new attractions. A drive down to the town and it’s not difficult to notice the emergence of hotels, restaurants, tarmac roads and lots of other complimentary infrastructure.

Developers are integrating infrastructure facilities in their development plans, creating traffic to their property. In developments such as gated communities and large scale housing estates, it’s common place to find, as standard features, proximity to malls, or upcoming malls, shopping complexes, green areas and parks, gyms and swimming pools, amongst a host of other amentities. Infrastructural development lures real estate developments due to the appeal of the area. Roads infrastructure, for instance, has opened up areas influencing property value, prompting the appreciation of prices in adjacent areas.

This would explain the high density effect the construction of by-passes across Nairobi has had on once exclusive and pristine neighbourhoods as Kileleshwa, Runda, Lower Kabete and Lavington. The roads that traverse these landscapes now have adversly opened up areas that were once inaccessible and reserved.

Lamudi MD Dan Karua says, “Projects like Lamu Port Southern Sudan Ethiopia (LAPSSET), the Thika superhighway, bypasses like Eastern, Southern and Northern, and the restoration of other roads have made the property prices in these areas appreciate drastically. Developers are benchmarking value of their property based on proximity to these areas.”

jkia 1

Airports aren’t being left behind, also undergoing development, with the major example of this being Jomo Kenyatta International Airport. Here the opening of Terminal 1A and the construction of the Greenfield Terminal which kicked off construction late last year, is set to boost the Airport’s status as an international hub: As Kenya is the major economic hub in East Africa many international firms will set their base here.

Development of the Commuter Railway System around Nairobi and the construction of the standard gauge line from Mombasa to Kisumu will widen the catchment area of real estate developments. Often perceived as far-flung and difficult to reach, areas like Kitengela, Athi River and Mlolongo have now experienced unprecedented growth with the Syokimau Railway line.

Savannah Silicon

Developments in the ICT sector have also facilitated the development of these areas as Konza City is to be constructed in this region. In addition, over 90 percent of Kenya’s population now live within GSM signal range: one of the highest rates in Africa, a good indicator for the telecommunications sector in the country.

“The Ministry of Energy and Petroleum plans to inject 5,000MW-plus into the national grid increasing Kenya’s power capacity to over 6,700MW, by the end of 2016. The result is expected to be cheaper electricity and increased capacity in the grid,” Karua noted.

The Power Sector has undergone reforms that have led to efficiency gains of 1 percent of GDP. Part of Kenya’s Vision 2030 is to enhance the production of affordable and reliable electricity of energy generation of 23,000 MW from the current 1,735MW. A nuclear energy plant is to be set-up by 2022 which is expected to generate 1000 MW, coal mining is about to be started, geothermal energy is being boosted this is to deviate from the dependence of hydroelectricity which isn’t reliable. In the case of the water sector, Kenya has already established a Water Resource Management Authority.

Expansion and growth of infrastructure is imperative to real estate developments. The high property prices are reflective of the valuation property investors are taking to determine the value of their land or rent charged.

Luxury Has a New Address

There’s no denying that there is the established luxury syndicate in any part of the globe, be it New York or Hong Kong, even right here in our beautiful green city in the sun, Nairobi. There may be three social classes: the recurrently poor, the sprawling middle class and the wealthy… but to the rich there are four classes: the servants (the poor), the pretenders (middle class), the detestable ‘new money’ who feel they have achieved this position of power and will stick there, as well as ‘old money’ from a long line of the elite.

I wasn’t much surprised then when I found out that plush and upmarket neighbourhoods such as Muthaiga don’t just let anyone into their back yard: you have to be from a long line of wealthy Kenyan citizens, in other words ‘old money’. As a result, it’s like we’re playing a new kind of colonial game. A resurgence of segregation not based on race this time, but on possession. Never in modern Earth’s history has materialism controlled human desire to such extraordinary extent.

I was recently reading an article about the 1971 Iranian Monarchy celebrations that took place over a period of roughly two weeks. Basically, the Persian monarchy was celebrating its 2,500th year of existence, right from the time of King Cyrus the Great’s rule, and was meant to demonstrate Iran’s long history and the extent of contemporary advancements the ’empire’ had achieved under the time of the then Shah of Iran, Mohammad Razah Pahlavi.

Aerial view of the Tent of Persepolis

The preparations for this historic event took well over a decade, as a remote city, Persepolis, was identified to host the modern milestone mainly because of security issues that would make it easier to monitor. The infrastructure of the city had to be extensively improved, including the upgrading of nearby Shiraz Airport and an additional highway for the anticipated number of high profile guests. The support staff and press were based in Shiraz as only the invited guests and dignitaries would be staying in Persepolis.

The Tent City of Persepolis (Photo: David Dorren)

The Iranian government flew in plants from France, and even hired the exquisite Parisian restaurant, Maxim’s to cater for the entire event (Maxim had to shut down its operations in the French capital for the duration of the celebrations). The Imperial household had elaborate uniforms designed for them as well and 250 custom made red Mercedes benz sedans purchased to ferry guests to and from the airport at Shiraz.

The venue of the Tent City of Persepolis was set on over 160 acres of land: luxury tented apartments adorned in the finest of gold and linen, all designed in a star shape around a graand fountain at the centre of the lay out. The inspiration for this was the 16th century Field of the Cloth of Gold that bore the Anglo-French treaty of 1514. In total, 600 guests, including a long list of Eurpoean royals and African presidents, dined for over 5 hours, making it a Guinness World record for the longest and most lavish official banquet in modern history.

The Persepolis Banquet

If you were wondering where the notion ‘the party of the century’ came from…well there’s your answer. There has never been such an extensively lavish and grand gathering, to date. President Jomo Kenyatta, Queen Elizabeth II and President Richard Nixon did not attend though, because of ‘security concerns’ though I would rather much bet it would have been Israeli influences and reservations.

Nairobi has its fair share of opulence when it comes to fine dining and accommodation. We have the ‘old money’ hotels that include the likes of what is now the Sarova Stanley, the Fairmont Norfolk and the Nairobi Serena, as well as the ‘new money’ creme that harbours the Sankara and the Tribe Hotel. It’s no secret that the middle class is growing, and the rich are getting richer, and with the city being a diplomatic and celebrity haven, we’re likely to see more ‘high end’ focussed offings taking shape.

Read my piece on Princes and (mostly) European palaces

It is also predicted that by just 2014, East and Central Africa’s financial and communication hub will see its bed space more than double, with international hotel brands, the Chinese and a plethora of local and international investors displaying their might. I’ve heard but rumours of Sheraton, Marriot and Hyatt even prospecting how and when they would set up shop in what is the Safari Capital of the World. And with news that Nairobi’s luxury property is a hot topic on a global scale, the only hinderance to this becoming a ‘wealthy and elite’ jungle is… time.

One of the avenues I think is most underutilised in Kenya is the fact that we are the only ‘Third World Country’ with a United Nations agency headquarters. According to the recently released Wealth Report though, experts were asked where they saw the world in the year 2050. A general agreement was that dominant global cities would be overtaken in importance and precedence by a group of cities networked.

Of course then in such a scenario, at the top of the list was Washington/New York/Chicago, followed by Hong Kong/Shanghai/Beijing. In the first scenario, the consensus was that the three cities would geopolitically become more important than the whole of the United States by then, also attributing this to the fact that when the Chinese premier Jintao visited, he not only went to the American capital, but also stopped by Chicago. The second scenario doesn’t need much convincing, as China’s global role perpetually continues to be ingrained.

The merger of the ‘Diplomats’ Geneva/Vienna/Nairobi

A series of groupings followed, including Berlin/Frankfurt, Istanbul/Ankara, Sao Paolo/Rio/Brasilia and Cairo/Beirut. The interesting addition was the mega connection that is Geneva/Vienna/Nairobi which Prof. Saskia Sassen, the writer of the section of the report, said was a critical mass generated by a combination of institutions devoted to social questions and justice for the powerless. She said the cities may have been long overshadowed by global finance and mega-militaries but they would emerge as critical actors in the global arena.

No wonder hotels like the Tribe, pride themselves as being at the heart of the city’s diplomatic street. Popular travel and leisure magazine show ‘Jet Set Extra’ was recently in the country to ‘experience Africa’ and here’s the brief clip and interview with the Hotel’s General Manager, Mark Somen.

Jetset Extra Visits Nairobi’s Tribe Hotel from Jetset Extra on Vimeo.

Is it surprising that Wikipedia defines ‘jet set’ as: a journalistic term used to describe an international social group of wealthy people.

Great cities like New York and London were built on the sweat of a dedicated generation that forged together with a general purpose of making their city the best…not for others, but for themselves.

Architectural History of the Green City in the Sun (Part 3)

Ewart Scott Grogan, popularly dubbed ‘Kenya’s Winston Churchill’, was a British entrepreneur and explorer and one of Kenya’s eccentric pioneers. He was also the first man to walk ‘the length of Africa’ from Cape Town to Cairo. It took him two and a half years but he arrived in Egypt by 1900. He grew up in Cambridge, England, where most of his schooling was done, but dropped out of Jesus College and went to study art in Bulawayo (of all places, I know!). Subsequently, he helped the British defence during the Matebele Wars then traversed the landscape to the then German East Africa… and after the 1st World War, most of his life was spent in East Africa and particularly in Kenya but he died in South Africa at the age of 92. Stanbic Bank, the bright red brick building at the junction of Kenyatta Avenue and Kimathi Street just opposite the iconic Nation Centre, occupies the first ever brick building to be put up in Nairobi, around 1923. Grogan initially developed it as Torr’s Hotel, designed by the architect H. Henderson, after the City Hall in Stockholm Sweden

Stanbic Bank (right) with a stretch of Kenyatta Avenue to ICEA and the iconic I&M tower

Rather interesting to discover was that Kenyatta Avenue, with its ‘concrete island’ smack in the middle of the multi lane, was designed wide enough such that a full team of oxen could turn around in it. By modern standards if you were to compare it however, you will find that times (and space) have indeed changed. Here is where visionary design should come in, much like when the Kenyan PM was commenting about the recent comparisons between Dar National Stadium and our very own Kasarani: The purpose of the stadium was to help Kenya host the 1987 All Africa Games…has our vision stagnated or regressed? I won’t divulge though, (*mental note: tackle that in a later blog). Right up the street, at the very threshold of the Nairobi CBD and opposite the General Post Office, is Kipande House (Now KCB Kenyatta Avenue).

KCB Kenyatta Avenue (left), juxtaposed next to the General Post Office

It used to be a railway depot, with a somewhat ‘displaced’ tower at the facade of this historic building where Africans working in colonial Nairobi were once required to be registered and issued with identification cards, and thus the name. The architecture is unique and timeless, and thus it still looks modern to this day.

The New Stanley, 1961

Arguably so, the most iconic building on K. Avenue has to be the Victorian-themed Stanley Hotel, notwithstanding I&M towers and the General Post Office. Well, initially, the Stanley started life as a boarding house on Victoria Street (later to be renamed Tom Mboya street) in 1902, but was shifted and constructed on its present site in 1913 and effectually named after the great African explorer.

The Sarova Stanley, today

The Hotel’s reputation as an important stopover for African travellers was especially cemented in 1961, with the creation of the famous Thorn Three Café. A single acacia tree at the centre of the café became a noticeboard for numerous travellers who would leave notes, letters and messages for fellow travellers pinned to the trunk. That tradition became so popular that the thorn tree became an icon for African travel. Eventually notice boards were erected to protect the tree.

 

The Thorn tree Cafe, Sarova Stanley

The original tree died a natural death though and has been replaced by a sapling. The Hotel was recently rebranded The New Sarova Stanley, and due to constant and timely renovation and upgrading, remains on of the leading 5 star luxurious hotels in the country.

Jeevanjee Gardens was the location of the first agricultural show in Kenya, way back in 1901.

 

Jeevanjee Gardens, the venue of Kenya's first agricultural show

The National Archives on what is now  Moi Avenue was initially built as the National Bank of India, with a rather commanding positioning at the heart of the city. Cameo Cinema was built in 1912 as Theatre Royal and has served as a variety of things though now it doubles up as a congregational hall at the ground level and as a restaurant and bar, the Verandah, at the top.

Panoramic View to the National Archives, 1960

The Kenya National Archives building, today

For all you amazing fact lovers, theres a suburb in the city of Milwaukee, Wisconsin USA known as ‘Harambee’. It happens to be just north of downtown Milwaukee and is bounded by I-43 on the west, Capitol Drive to the north, Holton St. on the east, and North Avenue to the south. Harambee includes the highest residential elevation in the city, a tall ridge running along 1st Street, that in the early 20th century was built upon by the city’s wealthy families. It is not surprising though that the area’s west and central areas had become the center of the City’s African American community by the 1950s. The middle class and slightly more affluent however left the area around the 70’s when the US open housing project kicked off and it has been devastated by slum clearance as well.

In my next post in the Architectural History series, I’ll be covering more sites within the CBD. Tell/tweet me what you think…

Architectural History of the Green City in the Sun (Part 2)

Lord Delamere was interestingly an indirect descendant of the first ever Prime Minister of Great Britain, Sir Robert Walpole. His family owned the Vale Royal Abbey which is a magnificent estate with some rich history of its own in Cheshire, UK. I tried to find out whether where the young Hugh Cholmondeley grew up had any impact on him but I’m yet to find that out. It seems he was less concerned with his own personal comfort and more with the affairs of both the settlers and the natives.

Vale Royal Abbey (Delamere Home)

Getting pictures or architectural information about the Soysambu ranch is difficult but I won’t give up just yet…Being extensively wealthy and the owner of huge chunks of land, it’s not surprising that he was known as the Cecil Rhodes of Kenya. Its believed that British settlers followed him both spiritually and politically. Such was his influence that he became president of the Colonists’ Association and a member in the Legislative council. Historians believe he genuinely was fond of Africans and particularly the Maasai. The Lord even entertained the British Under-Secretary, Sir Winston Churchill, on his maiden visit to Kenya. Well, I think thats as far as I will go about Lord Delamere.

A city of its size, Nairobi has a number of suburbs and areas. The colonials seem to have influenced, to this day, both the diversity and segregation of our suburbs as they are today. The British preferred the leafier western sections of Kileleshwa, Lavington, Highridge, Parklands, Gigiri and Runda although Kangemi and Dagoretti were exceptions, possibly workers who served the colonials were allowed to settle here. Picture this, if you were to look at say, Google Earth, viewing Nairobi, the West of the city happens to be much greener than the East! Try it… The colonials loved trees and wide picturesque avenues.

Meanwhile the Africans were handed settlements and estates in places to the east such as Dandora, Huruma, Pumwani, Kariobangi, Kariokor and Embakasi. Interesting to note, The East African Women’s League took it upon themselves to construct a Maternity facility for African women. They turned to the wife of the new Governor, Lady Grigg who formed a child welfare and maternity league and helped raise around Shs.17,000 for the Lady Grigg Maternity Home at Pumwani (now Pumwani Maternity Hospital) in 1928. This happens to be the reason why you may come across predominant industrial and mass market British architecture here.

The Asians ‘coolies’ who were brought to help construct the railway, mostly settled around what is today Starehe constituency, harbouring suburbs such as Southlands, parts of Parklands and Ngara. If you take a look at the architectural influence in these areas, you will see numerous oriental and ornate gables, intricately designed mosques, fabulous temples and a few shrines…

Much of what is today Lavington area initially belonged to the French Holy Ghost Fathers and was known as St Austins mission. Now you know why there are numerous schools or missionary-themed ammenities in the leafy suburb: Strathmore, St. Mary’s School, St. Austin’s School and Loreto Convent but to mention a few. The neighbourhood was quiet with a single shopping centre, Lavington Green, serving the entire area. The British settlers would commune there regularly over chat and brunch and the properties were modestly sized and characteristically renaissance themed Anglo Saxon brick structures with brown tiled roofs.

Danish author Karen Blixen migrated to Kenya in the 1910s and took on coffee farming. This was primarily towards the section of the city that is now Karen-Langata. There wasn’t much infrastructural development in that area, mainly because of the agricultural encroachment up until just after the second world war when the land was sub divided into 5 to 40 acre parcels of land and distributed to colonial government workers and ex-British forces. The Nairobi Urban District Council (now the City Council of Nairobi) attempted to impose building by laws in the area but they were aggressively opposed by residents who did not want to be told how to utilize their large tracts of land. After independence however, the newly formed CCN extended the boundaries of the city and Karen-Langata area came under by-law control. Nairobi begun growing at a rapid rate towards the 70s and 80s though, but this particular part of the city was experiencing slow development because of the large tracts of land residents owned: it also proved difficult and expensive to supply services over such huge distances. In order to spur growth, the City Council further subdivided the land making it more affordable for middle income Kenyans and increase its service charges.

Govt Rd (Now Moi Avenue) in 1920

The Central Business District of Nairobi arguably went through some of the most dynamic of changes. There’s usually a tussle about which was the most important of streets at the onset, but it seems Station Road (later to be Government Road) takes precedence, as the name suggests. Nairobi’s 3rd Avenue was another important street as it became the main artery way into the capital but was renamed Delamere Avenue in honour of one of the greatest of the Englishmen to settle in Kenya and even chair the Legislative council. An 8-foot bronze statue in his image was even erected at the avenue’s head, as his 2nd wife, Lady Gwladys became the first woman Mayor of Nairobi.

Kenyatta Avenue (Delamere Ave) as it was in the 1930s

There is also the notion that the entire city is centered around the ‘City Square’ which is basically enclosed all round by the Holy Family Basilica, the Nairobi Law Courts, City Hall, the Parliament Buildings and KICC. Did you know that what is currently the Bank or Baroda building right next to the ICEA building on Kenyatta Avenue used to be the Library for the East African Women’s League? The EAWL was led by Lady MacMillan. In the course of the research I undertook to begin the series, I discovered there is more and more that I would like to encompass and therefore in my next post I will cover Nairobi CBD solely, almost building by building…tell me what you think…

Click here to continue to Part 3 >>

Architectural History of the Green City City in the Sun (Part 1)

For quite a while now, I have been perturbed by the questions…who influenced the design of Nairobi? Why does it look the way it does today? What were the architectural influences of the day and what gave the glorious Kenyan capital its prestigious pedestal among its regional peers. If you have as much interest in local history as I do, then delve with me into the world of the conceptualization of Nairobi, up until it all became a reality…

Nairobi in 1900

I won’t bore you with most of what you already know, so let me take a different perspective from what you are used to, what you are not used to and might not have known. Well first, at the earliest of times, at least historically possible, it is believed only Swahili people occupied much of what is today Nairobi. But because of the growth in trade and the emergence of the Bantu-speaking tribes and the Nilotes, they chose to move further East towards the coast, where they met the first foreigners ever sighted on East African soil. I’d like to imagine what the reaction was…how long it took our ancestors to communicate with the Portuguese…whether or not it was amicable. I came across something else that was interesting, I thought maybe tribalism might have been rampant then, but did you know that the Bantu-speaking Nyoro people were ruled over by an elite Nilotic Luo clan known as the Bito? I sure didn’t!

Well, the swahili tribes moved before they had any significant impact on the development of the area, and much later, around 5 centuries, most of modern Nairobi was occupied by three critical tribesmen: the Maasai, the Kamba and the Kikuyu. The three mutually co-existed up until the advent of British settlers in the late 1800s and with that, an over half a century struggle with colonialism begun. What you might not have known is that the Sultan of Zanzibar is the one who granted the British permission to foray into the interior of the African mainland. Mombasa was at first the capital of what was the British East African Protectorate (now Uganda and Kenya), but with the construction of the railway, a trading post and game hunting centre to the West and interior, Nairobi steadily took shape, albeit unplanned and haphazardly. The plague broke out in the prior settlement and much of Nairobi had to be burnt down and the town was again gradually rebuilt.

Most of the British settlers were encouraged to settle in the country, but a particular settler, Hugh Cholmondeley…more popularly known as Lord Delamere, and his wife, Lady Anne Cole, took interest in the area around Nairobi. By 1907, the country was already home to Lords Cranworth, Hindlip, Cardross, Howard de Walden and another well-known Lord, Egerton . Kenya quickly became the Monaco of that era…a playground for the rich. Lord Delamere and a group of his privileged friends dubbed the Happy Valley set, embarked on making the triangular area of Nyeri, Naivasha and Nairobi their playground  involving a number of vices though which made them notorious on an almost global scale. That’s however, an entirely different story…

Part of the Happy Valley Set

In comes a man who was passionate about making his dominion a rival to other more prosperous parts of the British Empire: Sir Edward Grigg, governor of Kenya. Here I thought that the ties between Kenya and South Africa were recent…boy was I gravely mistaken. Our architecture is more heavily tied with that of South Africa, (traversing our current shopping malls and apartment complexes), and we can thank a certain Sir Herbert Baker for that. The countries are truly sister cities, if heritage and infrastructure is anything to go by. Sir Herbert Baker was a British architect who grew up in Kent, England, and was profoundly influenced by Norman and Anglo-Saxon Renaissance architecture.

Originally, he had embarked for South Africa in 1892 to visit his brother, but he ended up being commissioned by the Governor, Cecil Rhodes to remodel one of the buildings there. He later on ended up designing and constructing such iconic South African structures such as the Union Buildings and Rhodes Memorial. Well, Sir Edward Grigg invited him to Kenya in 1925.

European Nairobi School

The Governor and Lord Delamere then gave him the task of designing a model European school on African soil, and loosely based on Winchester School which was back home in England. He came up with what is modern day Nairobi Primary School, which was Nairobi School (now on Waiyaki Way). I’ll talk about those a little bit later. In the long run, he left alot of his mark on what is modern day Nairobi…designing State House, Nairobi and Mombasa, the lighthouse at the Coast, All Saints Cathedral and Nairobi Primary School. (You can even see how All Saints resembles the Fairbridge Church he did in Australia). His assistant later became the chief government architect, Mr. J. A Hoogterp.

Fairbridge Church in Australia

Hoogterp designed numerous buildings on his own though, also leaving his mark on the city. The masterplan for Nairobi was at the onset based on a combined ideology of Washington DC, Paris, Capetown, Pretoria, New Delhi and Canberra, the capital of Australia. In Part 2 of this series, we’ll find out about the blue prints for the Central Business District and the designs of the estates that surround the city….tell me what you think…

Click here to continue to Part 2 >>